Difference between revisions of "2001 AIME II Problems/Problem 13"

(Solution)
(Undo revision 61762 by XXQw3rtyXx (talk))
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== Problem ==
 
== Problem ==
 
In [[quadrilateral]] <math>ABCD</math>, <math>\angle{BAD}\cong\angle{ADC}</math> and <math>\angle{ABD}\cong\angle{BCD}</math>, <math>AB = 8</math>, <math>BD = 10</math>, and <math>BC = 6</math>. The length <math>CD</math> may be written in the form <math>\frac {m}{n}</math>, where <math>m</math> and <math>n</math> are relatively prime positive integers. Find <math>m + n</math>.
 
In [[quadrilateral]] <math>ABCD</math>, <math>\angle{BAD}\cong\angle{ADC}</math> and <math>\angle{ABD}\cong\angle{BCD}</math>, <math>AB = 8</math>, <math>BD = 10</math>, and <math>BC = 6</math>. The length <math>CD</math> may be written in the form <math>\frac {m}{n}</math>, where <math>m</math> and <math>n</math> are relatively prime positive integers. Find <math>m + n</math>.
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== Solution ==
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Extend <math>\overline{AD}</math> and <math>\overline{BC}</math> to meet at <math>E</math>. Then, since <math>\angle BAD = \angle ADC</math> and <math>\angle ABD = \angle DCE</math>, we know that <math>\triangle ABD \sim \triangle DCE</math>. Hence <math>\angle ADB = \angle DEC</math>, and <math>\triangle BDE</math> is [[isosceles triangle|isosceles]]. Then <math>BD = BE = 10</math>.
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<center><asy>
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/* We arbitrarily set AD = x */
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real x = 60^.5, anglesize = 28;
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pointpen = black; pathpen = black+linewidth(0.7); pen d = linetype("6 6")+linewidth(0.7);
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pair A=(0,0), D=(x,0), B=IP(CR(A,8),CR(D,10)), E=(-3x/5,0), C=IP(CR(E,16),CR(D,64/5));
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D(MP("A",A)--MP("B",B,NW)--MP("C",C,NW)--MP("D",D)--cycle); D(B--D); D(A--MP("E",E)--B,d);
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D(anglemark(D,A,B,anglesize));D(anglemark(C,D,A,anglesize));D(anglemark(A,B,D,anglesize));D(anglemark(E,C,D,anglesize));D(anglemark(A,B,D,5/4*anglesize));D(anglemark(E,C,D,5/4*anglesize));
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MP("10",(B+D)/2,SW);MP("8",(A+B)/2,W);MP("6",(B+C)/2,NW);
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</asy></center>
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Using the similarity, we have:
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<cmath>\frac{AB}{BD} = \frac 8{10} = \frac{CD}{CE} = \frac{CD}{16} \Longrightarrow CD = \frac{64}5</cmath>
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The answer is <math>m+n = \boxed{069}</math>.
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'''Extension''': Find <math>AD</math>.
  
 
== See also ==
 
== See also ==

Revision as of 13:18, 17 May 2014

Problem

In quadrilateral $ABCD$, $\angle{BAD}\cong\angle{ADC}$ and $\angle{ABD}\cong\angle{BCD}$, $AB = 8$, $BD = 10$, and $BC = 6$. The length $CD$ may be written in the form $\frac {m}{n}$, where $m$ and $n$ are relatively prime positive integers. Find $m + n$.

Solution

Extend $\overline{AD}$ and $\overline{BC}$ to meet at $E$. Then, since $\angle BAD = \angle ADC$ and $\angle ABD = \angle DCE$, we know that $\triangle ABD \sim \triangle DCE$. Hence $\angle ADB = \angle DEC$, and $\triangle BDE$ is isosceles. Then $BD = BE = 10$.

[asy] /* We arbitrarily set AD = x */ real x = 60^.5, anglesize = 28;  pointpen = black; pathpen = black+linewidth(0.7); pen d = linetype("6 6")+linewidth(0.7); pair A=(0,0), D=(x,0), B=IP(CR(A,8),CR(D,10)), E=(-3x/5,0), C=IP(CR(E,16),CR(D,64/5)); D(MP("A",A)--MP("B",B,NW)--MP("C",C,NW)--MP("D",D)--cycle); D(B--D); D(A--MP("E",E)--B,d); D(anglemark(D,A,B,anglesize));D(anglemark(C,D,A,anglesize));D(anglemark(A,B,D,anglesize));D(anglemark(E,C,D,anglesize));D(anglemark(A,B,D,5/4*anglesize));D(anglemark(E,C,D,5/4*anglesize)); MP("10",(B+D)/2,SW);MP("8",(A+B)/2,W);MP("6",(B+C)/2,NW); [/asy]

Using the similarity, we have:

\[\frac{AB}{BD} = \frac 8{10} = \frac{CD}{CE} = \frac{CD}{16} \Longrightarrow CD = \frac{64}5\]

The answer is $m+n = \boxed{069}$.


Extension: Find $AD$.

See also

2001 AIME II (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 12
Followed by
Problem 14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
All AIME Problems and Solutions

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