Difference between revisions of "2006 AIME I Problems"

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{{AIME Problems|year=2006|n=I}}
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== Problem 1 ==
 
== Problem 1 ==
In convex hexagon <math>ABCDEF</math>, all six sides are congruent, <math>\angle A</math> and <math>\angle D</math> are right angles, and <math>\angle B, \angle C, \angle E,</math> and <math>\angle F</math> are congruent. The area of the hexagonal region is <math>2116(\sqrt{2}+1).</math> Find <math>AB</math>.
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In quadrilateral <math> ABCD , \angle B </math> is a right angle, diagonal <math> \overline{AC} </math> is perpendicular to <math> \overline{CD}, AB=18, BC=21, </math> and <math> CD=14. </math> Find the perimeter of <math> ABCD. </math>
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 1|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 1|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 2 ==
 
== Problem 2 ==
 
+
Let set <math> \mathcal{A} </math> be a 90-element subset of <math> \{1,2,3,\ldots,100\}, </math> and let <math> S </math> be the sum of the elements of <math> \mathcal{A}. </math> Find the number of possible values of <math> S. </math>
The lengths of the sides of a triangle with positive area are <math>\log_{10} 12</math>, <math>\log_{10} 75</math>, and <math>\log_{10} n</math>, where <math>n</math> is a positive integer. Find the number of possible values for <math>n</math>.
 
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 2|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 2|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 3 ==
 
== Problem 3 ==
Let <math> P </math> be the product of the first 100 positive odd integers. Find the largest integer <math> k </math> such that <math> P </math> is divisible by <math> 3^k </math>
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Find the least positive integer such that when its leftmost digit is deleted, the resulting integer is <math>1/29</math> of the original integer.
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 3|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 3|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 4 ==
 
== Problem 4 ==
 
+
Let <math> N </math> be the number of consecutive 0's at the right end of the decimal representation of the product <math> 1!2!3!4!\cdots99!100!. </math> Find the remainder when <math> N </math> is divided by 1000.
Let <math> (a_1,a_2,a_3,\ldots,a_{12}) </math> be a permutation of <math> (1,2,3,\ldots,12) </math> for which
 
 
 
<center><math> a_1>a_2>a_3>a_4>a_5>a_6 \mathrm{\  and \ } a_6<a_7<a_8<a_9<a_{10}<a_{11}<a_{12}. </math></center>
 
 
 
An example of such a permutation is <math> (6,5,4,3,2,1,7,8,9,10,11,12). </math> Find the number of such permutations.
 
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 4|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 4|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 5 ==
 
== Problem 5 ==
When rolling a certain unfair six-sided die with faces numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, the probability of obtaining face <math> F </math> is greater than 1/6, the probability of obtaining the face opposite is less than 1/6, the probability of obtaining any one of the other four faces is 1/6, and the sum of the numbers on opposite faces is 7. When two such dice are rolled, the probability of obtaining a sum of 7 is 47/288. Given that the probability of obtaining face <math> F </math> is <math> m/n, </math> where <math> m </math> and <math> n </math> are relatively prime positive integers, find <math> m+n. </math>  
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The number <math> \sqrt{104\sqrt{6}+468\sqrt{10}+144\sqrt{15}+2006}</math> can be written as <math> a\sqrt{2}+b\sqrt{3}+c\sqrt{5}, </math> where <math> a, b, </math> and <math> c </math> are positive integers. Find <math> abc. </math>
 
 
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 5|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 5|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 6 ==
 
== Problem 6 ==
Square <math> ABCD </math> has sides of length 1. Points <math> E </math> and <math> F </math> are on <math> \overline{BC} </math> and <math> \overline{CD}, </math> respectively, so that <math> \triangle AEF </math> is equilateral. A square with vertex <math> B </math> has sides that are parallel to those of <math> ABCD </math> and a vertex on <math> \overline{AE}. </math> The length of a side of this smaller square is <math>\frac{a-\sqrt{b}}{c}, </math> where <math> a, b, </math> and <math> c </math> are positive integers and <math> b</math> is not divisible by the square of any prime. Find <math> a+b+c. </math>
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Let <math> \mathcal{S} </math> be the set of real numbers that can be represented as repeating decimals of the form <math> 0.\overline{abc} </math> where <math> a, b, c </math> are distinct digits. Find the sum of the elements of <math> \mathcal{S}. </math>
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 6|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 6|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 7 ==
 
== Problem 7 ==
Find the number of ordered pairs of positive integers <math> (a,b) </math> such that <math> a+b=1000 </math> and neither <math> a </math> nor <math> b </math> has a zero digit.
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An angle is drawn on a set of equally spaced parallel lines as shown. The ratio of the area of shaded region <math>C</math> to the area of shaded region <math>B</math> is <math>\frac{11}{5}</math>. Find the ratio of shaded region <math>D</math> to the area of shaded region <math>A</math>
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 +
[[Image:2006AimeA7.PNG]]
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 7|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 7|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 8 ==
 
== Problem 8 ==
There is an unlimited supply of congruent equilateral triangles made of colored paper. Each triangle is a solid color with the same color on both sides of the paper. A large equilateral triangle is constructed from four of these paper triangles. Two large triangles are considered distinguishable if it is not possible to place one on the other, using translations, rotations, and/or reflections, so that their corresponding small triangles are of the same color.
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Hexagon <math> ABCDEF </math> is divided into five rhombuses, <math>P, Q, R, S,</math> and <math>T</math>, as shown. Rhombuses <math>P, Q, R,</math> and <math>S</math> are congruent, and each has area <math> \sqrt{2006}. </math> Let <math> K </math> be the area of rhombus <math>T</math>. Given that <math> K </math> is a positive integer, find the number of possible values for <math> K. </math>
  
Given that there are six different colors of triangles from which to choose, how many distinguishable large equilateral triangles may be formed?
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[[Image:2006AimeA8.PNG]]
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 8|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 8|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 9 ==
 
== Problem 9 ==
Circles <math> \mathcal{C}_1, \mathcal{C}_2, </math> and <math> \mathcal{C}_3 </math> have their centers at (0,0), (12,0), and (24,0), and have radii 1, 2, and 4, respectively. Line <math> t_1 </math> is a common internal tangent to <math>\mathcal{C}_1</math> and <math>\mathcal{C}_2</math> and has a positive slope, and line <math>t_2</math> is a common internal tangent to <math>\mathcal{C}_2</math> and <math>\mathcal{C}_3</math> and has a negative slope. Given that lines <math>t_1</math> and <math>t_2</math> intersect at <math>(x,y),</math> and that <math>x=p-q\sqrt{r},</math> where <math>p, q,</math> and <math>r</math> are positive integers and <math>r</math> is not divisible by the square of any prime, find <math>p+q+r.</math>
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The sequence <math> a_1, a_2, \ldots </math> is geometric with <math> a_1=a </math> and common ratio <math> r, </math> where <math> a </math> and <math> r </math> are positive integers. Given that <math> \log_8 a_1+\log_8 a_2+\cdots+\log_8 a_{12} = 2006, </math> find the number of possible ordered pairs <math> (a,r). </math>
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 9|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 9|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 10 ==
 
== Problem 10 ==
Seven teams play a soccer tournament in which each team plays every other team exactly once. No ties occur, each team has a <math> 50\% </math> chance of winning each game it plays, and the outcomes of the games are independent. In each game, the winner is awarded a point and the loser gets 0 points. The total points are accumilated to decide the ranks of the teams. In the first game of the tournament, team <math> A </math> beats team <math> B. </math> The probability that team <math> A </math> finishes with more points than team <math> B </math> is <math> m/n, </math> where <math> m </math> and <math> n </math> are relatively prime positive integers. Find <math> m+n. </math>
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Eight circles of diameter 1 are packed in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane as shown. Let region <math> \mathcal{R} </math> be the union of the eight circular regions. Line <math> l, </math> with slope 3, divides <math> \mathcal{R} </math> into two regions of equal area. Line <math> l </math>'s equation can be expressed in the form <math> ax=by+c, </math> where <math> a, b, </math> and <math> c </math> are positive integers whose greatest common divisor is 1. Find <math> a^2+b^2+c^2. </math>  
  
 +
<asy>
 +
unitsize(0.50cm);
 +
draw((0,-1)--(0,6));
 +
draw((-1,0)--(6,0));
 +
draw(shift(1,1)*unitcircle);
 +
draw(shift(1,3)*unitcircle);
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draw(shift(1,5)*unitcircle);
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draw(shift(3,1)*unitcircle);
 +
draw(shift(3,3)*unitcircle);
 +
draw(shift(3,5)*unitcircle);
 +
draw(shift(5,1)*unitcircle);
 +
draw(shift(5,3)*unitcircle);
 +
</asy>
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 10|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 10|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 11 ==
 
== Problem 11 ==
A sequence is defined as follows <math> a_1=a_2=a_3=1, </math> and, for all positive integers <math> n, a_{n+3}=a_{n+2}+a_{n+1}+a_n. </math> Given that <math> a_{28}=6090307, a_{29}=11201821, </math> and <math> a_{30}=20603361, </math> find the remainder when <math>\sum^{28}_{k=1} a_k </math> is divided by 1000.
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A collection of 8 cubes consists of one cube with edge-length <math> k </math> for each integer <math> k, 1 \le k \le 8. </math> A tower is to be built using all 8 cubes according to the rules:
 +
 
 +
* Any cube may be the bottom cube in the tower.
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* The cube immediately on top of a cube with edge-length <math> k </math> must have edge-length at most <math> k+2. </math>  
 +
 
 +
Let <math> T </math> be the number of different towers than can be constructed. What is the remainder when <math> T </math> is divided by 1000?
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 11|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 11|Solution]]
  
 
== Problem 12 ==
 
== Problem 12 ==
 
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Find the sum of the values of <math> x </math> such that <math> \cos^3 3x+ \cos^3 5x = 8 \cos^3 4x \cos^3 x, </math> where <math> x </math> is measured in degrees and <math> 100< x< 200. </math>
Equilateral <math> \triangle ABC </math> is inscribed in a circle of radius 2. Extend <math> \overline{AB} </math> through <math> B </math> to point <math> D </math> so that <math> AD=13, </math> and extend <math> \overline{AC} </math> through <math> C </math> to point <math> E </math> so that <math> AE = 11. </math> Through <math> D, </math> draw a line <math> l_1 </math> parallel to <math> \overline{AE}, </math> and through <math> E, </math> draw a line <math> l_2 </math> parallel to <math> \overline{AD}. </math> Let <math> F </math> be the intersection of <math> l_1 </math> and <math> l_2. </math> Let <math> G </math> be the point on the circle that is collinear with <math> A </math> and <math> F </math> and distinct from <math> A. </math> Given that the area of <math> \triangle CBG </math> can be expressed in the form <math> \frac{p\sqrt{q}}{r}, </math> where <math> p, q, </math> and <math> r </math> are positive integers, <math> p </math> and <math> r</math>  are relatively prime, and <math> q </math> is not divisible by the square of any prime, find <math> p+q+r. </math>
 
{{image needed}}
 
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 12|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 12|Solution]]
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== Problem 14 ==
 
== Problem 14 ==
A tripod has three legs each of length 5 feet. When the tripod is set up, the angle between any pair of legs is equal to the angle between any other pair, and the top of the tripod is 4 feet from the ground In setting up the tripod, the lower 1 foot of one leg breaks off. Let <math> h </math> be the height in feet of the top of the tripod from the ground when the broken tripod is set up. Then <math> h </math> can be written in the form <math> \frac m{\sqrt{n}}, </math> where <math> m </math> and <math> n </math> are positive integers and <math> n </math> is not divisible by the square of any prime. Find <math> \lfloor m+\sqrt{n}\rfloor. </math> (The notation <math> \lfloor x\rfloor </math> denotes the greatest integer that is less than or equal to <math> x. </math>)
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A tripod has three legs each of length 5 feet. When the tripod is set up, the angle between any pair of legs is equal to the angle between any other pair, and the top of the tripod is 4 feet from the ground. In setting up the tripod, the lower 1 foot of one leg breaks off. Let <math> h </math> be the height in feet of the top of the tripod from the ground when the broken tripod is set up. Then <math> h </math> can be written in the form <math> \frac m{\sqrt{n}}, </math> where <math> m </math> and <math> n </math> are positive integers and <math> n </math> is not divisible by the square of any prime. Find <math> \lfloor m+\sqrt{n}\rfloor. </math> (The notation <math> \lfloor x\rfloor </math> denotes the greatest integer that is less than or equal to <math> x. </math>)
  
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 14|Solution]]
 
[[2006 AIME I Problems/Problem 14|Solution]]
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== See also ==
 
== See also ==
 +
 +
{{AIME box|year = 2006|n=I|before=[[2005 AIME II Problems]]|after=[[2006 AIME II Problems]]}}
 +
 
* [[American Invitational Mathematics Examination]]
 
* [[American Invitational Mathematics Examination]]
 
* [[AIME Problems and Solutions]]
 
* [[AIME Problems and Solutions]]
 
* [http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Community/AoPS_Y_MJ_Transcripts.php?mj_id=144 2006 AIME I Math Jam Transcript]
 
* [http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Community/AoPS_Y_MJ_Transcripts.php?mj_id=144 2006 AIME I Math Jam Transcript]
 
* [[Mathematics competition resources]]
 
* [[Mathematics competition resources]]
 +
{{MAA Notice}}

Latest revision as of 17:19, 13 August 2020

2006 AIME I (Answer Key)
Printable version | AoPS Contest Collections

Instructions

  1. This is a 15-question, 3-hour examination. All answers are integers ranging from $000$ to $999$, inclusive. Your score will be the number of correct answers; i.e., there is neither partial credit nor a penalty for wrong answers.
  2. No aids other than scratch paper, graph paper, ruler, compass, and protractor are permitted. In particular, calculators and computers are not permitted.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Problem 1

In quadrilateral $ABCD , \angle B$ is a right angle, diagonal $\overline{AC}$ is perpendicular to $\overline{CD},  AB=18, BC=21,$ and $CD=14.$ Find the perimeter of $ABCD.$

Solution

Problem 2

Let set $\mathcal{A}$ be a 90-element subset of $\{1,2,3,\ldots,100\},$ and let $S$ be the sum of the elements of $\mathcal{A}.$ Find the number of possible values of $S.$

Solution

Problem 3

Find the least positive integer such that when its leftmost digit is deleted, the resulting integer is $1/29$ of the original integer.

Solution

Problem 4

Let $N$ be the number of consecutive 0's at the right end of the decimal representation of the product $1!2!3!4!\cdots99!100!.$ Find the remainder when $N$ is divided by 1000.

Solution

Problem 5

The number $\sqrt{104\sqrt{6}+468\sqrt{10}+144\sqrt{15}+2006}$ can be written as $a\sqrt{2}+b\sqrt{3}+c\sqrt{5},$ where $a, b,$ and $c$ are positive integers. Find $abc.$

Solution

Problem 6

Let $\mathcal{S}$ be the set of real numbers that can be represented as repeating decimals of the form $0.\overline{abc}$ where $a, b, c$ are distinct digits. Find the sum of the elements of $\mathcal{S}.$

Solution

Problem 7

An angle is drawn on a set of equally spaced parallel lines as shown. The ratio of the area of shaded region $C$ to the area of shaded region $B$ is $\frac{11}{5}$. Find the ratio of shaded region $D$ to the area of shaded region $A$

2006AimeA7.PNG

Solution

Problem 8

Hexagon $ABCDEF$ is divided into five rhombuses, $P, Q, R, S,$ and $T$, as shown. Rhombuses $P, Q, R,$ and $S$ are congruent, and each has area $\sqrt{2006}.$ Let $K$ be the area of rhombus $T$. Given that $K$ is a positive integer, find the number of possible values for $K.$

2006AimeA8.PNG

Solution

Problem 9

The sequence $a_1, a_2, \ldots$ is geometric with $a_1=a$ and common ratio $r,$ where $a$ and $r$ are positive integers. Given that $\log_8 a_1+\log_8 a_2+\cdots+\log_8 a_{12} = 2006,$ find the number of possible ordered pairs $(a,r).$

Solution

Problem 10

Eight circles of diameter 1 are packed in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane as shown. Let region $\mathcal{R}$ be the union of the eight circular regions. Line $l,$ with slope 3, divides $\mathcal{R}$ into two regions of equal area. Line $l$'s equation can be expressed in the form $ax=by+c,$ where $a, b,$ and $c$ are positive integers whose greatest common divisor is 1. Find $a^2+b^2+c^2.$

[asy] unitsize(0.50cm); draw((0,-1)--(0,6)); draw((-1,0)--(6,0)); draw(shift(1,1)*unitcircle); draw(shift(1,3)*unitcircle); draw(shift(1,5)*unitcircle); draw(shift(3,1)*unitcircle); draw(shift(3,3)*unitcircle); draw(shift(3,5)*unitcircle); draw(shift(5,1)*unitcircle); draw(shift(5,3)*unitcircle); [/asy]

Solution

Problem 11

A collection of 8 cubes consists of one cube with edge-length $k$ for each integer $k, 1 \le k \le 8.$ A tower is to be built using all 8 cubes according to the rules:

  • Any cube may be the bottom cube in the tower.
  • The cube immediately on top of a cube with edge-length $k$ must have edge-length at most $k+2.$

Let $T$ be the number of different towers than can be constructed. What is the remainder when $T$ is divided by 1000?

Solution

Problem 12

Find the sum of the values of $x$ such that $\cos^3 3x+ \cos^3 5x = 8 \cos^3 4x \cos^3 x,$ where $x$ is measured in degrees and $100< x< 200.$

Solution

Problem 13

For each even positive integer $x,$ let $g(x)$ denote the greatest power of 2 that divides $x.$ For example, $g(20)=4$ and $g(16)=16.$ For each positive integer $n,$ let $S_n=\sum_{k=1}^{2^{n-1}}g(2k).$ Find the greatest integer $n$ less than 1000 such that $S_n$ is a perfect square.

Solution

Problem 14

A tripod has three legs each of length 5 feet. When the tripod is set up, the angle between any pair of legs is equal to the angle between any other pair, and the top of the tripod is 4 feet from the ground. In setting up the tripod, the lower 1 foot of one leg breaks off. Let $h$ be the height in feet of the top of the tripod from the ground when the broken tripod is set up. Then $h$ can be written in the form $\frac m{\sqrt{n}},$ where $m$ and $n$ are positive integers and $n$ is not divisible by the square of any prime. Find $\lfloor m+\sqrt{n}\rfloor.$ (The notation $\lfloor x\rfloor$ denotes the greatest integer that is less than or equal to $x.$)

Solution

Problem 15

Given that a sequence satisfies $x_0=0$ and $|x_k|=|x_{k-1}+3|$ for all integers $k\ge 1,$ find the minimum possible value of $|x_1+x_2+\cdots+x_{2006}|.$

Solution

See also

2006 AIME I (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
2005 AIME II Problems
Followed by
2006 AIME II Problems
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
All AIME Problems and Solutions

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