Difference between revisions of "2009 AIME I Problems/Problem 6"

(Solution)
(Solution)
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Because <math>{\lfloor x\rfloor}</math> must be an integer, we can do some simple case work:
 
Because <math>{\lfloor x\rfloor}</math> must be an integer, we can do some simple case work:
  
For <math>{\lfloor x\rfloor}=0</math>, <math>N=1</math> no matter what <math>x</math> is
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For <math>{\lfloor x\rfloor}=0</math>, <math>N=1</math> as long as <math>x \neq 0</math>. This gives us <math>1</math> value of <math>N</math>.
  
 
For <math>{\lfloor x\rfloor}=1</math>, <math>N</math> can be anything between <math>1^1</math> to <math>2^1</math> excluding <math>2^1</math>
 
For <math>{\lfloor x\rfloor}=1</math>, <math>N</math> can be anything between <math>1^1</math> to <math>2^1</math> excluding <math>2^1</math>

Revision as of 20:19, 23 March 2015

Problem

How many positive integers $N$ less than $1000$ are there such that the equation $x^{\lfloor x\rfloor} = N$ has a solution for $x$? (The notation $\lfloor x\rfloor$ denotes the greatest integer that is less than or equal to $x$.)

Solution

First, $x$ must be less than $5$, since otherwise $x^{\lfloor x\rfloor}$ would be at least $3125$ which is greater than $1000$.

Because ${\lfloor x\rfloor}$ must be an integer, we can do some simple case work:

For ${\lfloor x\rfloor}=0$, $N=1$ as long as $x \neq 0$. This gives us $1$ value of $N$.

For ${\lfloor x\rfloor}=1$, $N$ can be anything between $1^1$ to $2^1$ excluding $2^1$

Theerefore, $N=1$. However, we got N=1 in case 1 so it got counted twice.

For ${\lfloor x\rfloor}=2$, $N$ can be anything between $2^2$ to $3^2$ excluding $3^2$

This gives us $3^2-2^2=5$ $N$'s

For ${\lfloor x\rfloor}=3$, $N$ can be anything between $3^3$ to $4^3$ excluding $4^3$

This gives us $4^3-3^3=37$ $N$'s

For ${\lfloor x\rfloor}=4$, $N$ can be anything between $4^4$ to $5^4$ excluding $5^4$

This gives us $5^4-4^4=369$ $N$'s

Since $x$ must be less than $5$, we can stop here and the answer is $1+5+37+369= \boxed {412}$ possible values for $N$.

See also

2009 AIME I (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 5
Followed by
Problem 7
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
All AIME Problems and Solutions

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