2015 AMC 8 Problems/Problem 15

Revision as of 15:58, 2 February 2018 by G1zq (talk | contribs) (Solution 1)

At Euler Middle School, $198$ students voted on two issues in a school referendum with the following results: $149$ voted in favor of the first issue and $119$ voted in favor of the second issue. If there were exactly $29$ students who voted against both issues, how many students voted in favor of both issues?

$\textbf{(A) }49\qquad\textbf{(B) }70\qquad\textbf{(C) }79\qquad\textbf{(D) }99\qquad \textbf{(E) }149$

Solution 1

We can see that this is a Venn Diagram Problem.[SOMEBODY DRAW IT PLEASE]

First, we analyze the information given. There are $198$ students. Let's use A as the first issue and B as the second issue.

$149$ students were for the A, and $119$ students were for B. There were also $29$ students against both A and B.

Solving this without a Venn Diagram, we subtract $29$ away from the total, $198$. Out of the remaining $169$ , we have $149$ people for A and

$119$ people for B. We add this up to get $268$ . Since that is more than what we need, we subtract $169$ from $268$ to get

$\boxed{\textbf{(D)}~99}$

Solution 2

There are 198 people. We know that 29 people voted against both the first issue and the second issue. That leaves us with 169 people that voted for at least one of them. If 119 people voted for both of them, then that would leave 20 people out of the vote, because 149 is less than 169 people. 169-149 is 20, so to make it even, we have to take 20 away from the 119 people, which leaves us with $\boxed{\textbf{(D)}~99}$

See Also

2015 AMC 8 (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 14
Followed by
Problem 16
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AJHSME/AMC 8 Problems and Solutions

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