Difference between revisions of "2016 AIME I Problems/Problem 12"

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(Solution)
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<cmath>(2\cdot 11^2-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-4\cdot 11^2+1 <4\cdot 11^4-43<(2\cdot 11^2)^2,</cmath>
 
<cmath>(2\cdot 11^2-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-4\cdot 11^2+1 <4\cdot 11^4-43<(2\cdot 11^2)^2,</cmath>
 
hence we have pinned a perfect square <math>(2m-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-43</math> strictly between two consecutive perfect squares, a contradiction. Hence <math>pqrs \ge 11^3 \cdot 13</math>. Thus <math>m^2-m+11\ge 11^3\cdot 13</math>, or <math>(m-132)(m+131)\ge0</math>. From the inequality, we see that <math>m \ge 132</math>. <math>132^2 - 132 + 11 = 11^3 \cdot 13</math>, so <math>m = 132</math> and we are done.
 
hence we have pinned a perfect square <math>(2m-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-43</math> strictly between two consecutive perfect squares, a contradiction. Hence <math>pqrs \ge 11^3 \cdot 13</math>. Thus <math>m^2-m+11\ge 11^3\cdot 13</math>, or <math>(m-132)(m+131)\ge0</math>. From the inequality, we see that <math>m \ge 132</math>. <math>132^2 - 132 + 11 = 11^3 \cdot 13</math>, so <math>m = 132</math> and we are done.
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==Solution 2==
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Let <math>m=11k</math>, then <math>s=m^2-m+11=11(11k^2-k+1)</math>. We can see <math>k = 1 \mod 11</math> for <math>s</math> to have a second factor of 11. Let <math>k=12</math>, we get <math>11k^2-k+1=11*11*13</math>, so <math>m=11*12=132</math>. -Mathdummy
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==
 
{{AIME box|year=2016|n=I|num-b=11|num-a=13}}
 
{{AIME box|year=2016|n=I|num-b=11|num-a=13}}
 
{{MAA Notice}}
 
{{MAA Notice}}

Revision as of 13:29, 14 January 2019

Problem

Find the least positive integer $m$ such that $m^2 - m + 11$ is a product of at least four not necessarily distinct primes.

Solution

$m(m-1)$ is the product of two consecutive integers, so it is always even. Thus $m(m-1)+11$ is odd and never divisible by $2$. Thus any prime $p$ that divides $m^2-m+11$ must divide $4m^2-4m+44=(2m-1)^2+43$. We see that $(2m-1)^2\equiv -43\pmod{p}$. We can verify that $-43$ is not a perfect square mod $p$ for each of $p=3,5,7$. Therefore, all prime factors of $m^2-m+11$ are greater than or equal to $11$.

Let $m^2 - m + 11 = pqrs$ for primes $p, q, r, s\ge11$. If $p, q, r, s = 11$, then $m^2-m+11=11^4$. We can multiply this by $4$ and complete the square to find $(2m-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-43$. But \[(2\cdot 11^2-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-4\cdot 11^2+1 <4\cdot 11^4-43<(2\cdot 11^2)^2,\] hence we have pinned a perfect square $(2m-1)^2=4\cdot 11^4-43$ strictly between two consecutive perfect squares, a contradiction. Hence $pqrs \ge 11^3 \cdot 13$. Thus $m^2-m+11\ge 11^3\cdot 13$, or $(m-132)(m+131)\ge0$. From the inequality, we see that $m \ge 132$. $132^2 - 132 + 11 = 11^3 \cdot 13$, so $m = 132$ and we are done.

Solution 2

Let $m=11k$, then $s=m^2-m+11=11(11k^2-k+1)$. We can see $k = 1 \mod 11$ for $s$ to have a second factor of 11. Let $k=12$, we get $11k^2-k+1=11*11*13$, so $m=11*12=132$. -Mathdummy

See Also

2016 AIME I (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 11
Followed by
Problem 13
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
All AIME Problems and Solutions

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