Difference between revisions of "2019 AMC 12A Problems/Problem 15"

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==Solution 2==
 
==Solution 2==
  
Given that <math>\sqrt{\log{a}}</math> and <math>\sqrt{\log{b}}</math> are both integers, <math>a</math> and <math>b</math> must be in the form <math>10^{m^2}</math> and <math>10^{n^2}</math>, respectively for some positive integers <math>m</math> and <math>n</math>. Note that <math>\log \sqrt{a} = \frac{m^2}{2}</math>. By substituting for a and b, the equation becomes <math>m + n + \frac{m^2}{2} + \frac{n^2}{2} = 100</math>. After multiplying the equation by 2 and completing the square with respect to <math>m</math> and <math>n</math>, the equation becomes <math>(m + 1)^2 + (n + 1)^2 = 202</math>. Testing squares of positive integers that add to <math>202</math>, <math>11^2 + 9^2</math> is the only option. WLOG, let <math>m = 10</math> and <math>n = 8</math>. Plugging <math>m</math> and <math>n</math> to solve for <math>a</math> and <math>b</math> gives us <math>a = 10^{100}</math> and <math>b = 10^{64}</math>. Therefore, <math>ab = \boxed{\textbf{(D) } 100^{164}}</math>.
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Given that <math>\sqrt{\log{a}}</math> and <math>\sqrt{\log{b}}</math> are both integers, <math>a</math> and <math>b</math> must be in the form <math>10^{m^2}</math> and <math>10^{n^2}</math>, respectively for some positive integers <math>m</math> and <math>n</math>. Note that <math>\log \sqrt{a} = \frac{m^2}{2}</math>. By substituting for a and b, the equation becomes <math>m + n + \frac{m^2}{2} + \frac{n^2}{2} = 100</math>. After multiplying the equation by 2 and completing the square with respect to <math>m</math> and <math>n</math>, the equation becomes <math>(m + 1)^2 + (n + 1)^2 = 202</math>. Testing squares of positive integers that add to <math>202</math>, <math>11^2 + 9^2</math> is the only option. WLOG, let <math>m = 10</math> and <math>n = 8</math>. Plugging <math>m</math> and <math>n</math> to solve for <math>a</math> and <math>b</math> gives us <math>a = 10^{100}</math> and <math>b = 10^{64}</math>. Therefore, <math>ab = \boxed{\textbf{(D) } 10^{164}}</math>.
  
 
==See Also==
 
==See Also==

Revision as of 11:00, 10 February 2019

Problem

Positive real numbers $a$ and $b$ have the property that \[\sqrt{\log{a}} + \sqrt{\log{b}} + \log \sqrt{a} + \log \sqrt{b} = 100\] and all four terms on the left are positive integers, where log denotes the base 10 logarithm. What is $ab$?

$\textbf{(A) }   10^{52}   \qquad        \textbf{(B) }   10^{100}   \qquad    \textbf{(C) }   10^{144}   \qquad   \textbf{(D) }  10^{164} \qquad  \textbf{(E) }   10^{200}$

Solution 1

Since all four terms on the left are positive integers, from $\sqrt{\log{a}}$, we know that both $\log{a}$ has to be perfect square and $a$ has to be a power of ten. The same applies to $b$ for the same reason. Setting $a$ and $b$ to $10^x$ and $10^y$, where $x$ and $y$ are the perfect squares, $ab = 10^{x+y}$. By listing all the perfect squares up to $14^2$ (as $15^2$ is larger than the largest possible sum of $x$ and $y$ of $200$ from answer choice $E$), two of those perfect squares must add up to one of the possible sums of $x$ and $y$ given from the answer choices ($52$, $100$, $144$, $164$, or $200$).

Only a couple possible sums are seen: $16+36=52$, $36+64=100$, $64+100=164$, $100+100=200$, and $4+196=200$. By testing each of these (by seeing whether $\sqrt{x} + \sqrt{b} + \frac{x}{2} + \frac{y}{2} = 100$), only the pair $x = 64$ and $y=100$ work. Therefore, $a$ and $b$ are $10^{64}$ and $10^{100}$, and our answer is $\boxed{\textbf{(D) } 10^{164}}$.

Solution 2

Given that $\sqrt{\log{a}}$ and $\sqrt{\log{b}}$ are both integers, $a$ and $b$ must be in the form $10^{m^2}$ and $10^{n^2}$, respectively for some positive integers $m$ and $n$. Note that $\log \sqrt{a} = \frac{m^2}{2}$. By substituting for a and b, the equation becomes $m + n + \frac{m^2}{2} + \frac{n^2}{2} = 100$. After multiplying the equation by 2 and completing the square with respect to $m$ and $n$, the equation becomes $(m + 1)^2 + (n + 1)^2 = 202$. Testing squares of positive integers that add to $202$, $11^2 + 9^2$ is the only option. WLOG, let $m = 10$ and $n = 8$. Plugging $m$ and $n$ to solve for $a$ and $b$ gives us $a = 10^{100}$ and $b = 10^{64}$. Therefore, $ab = \boxed{\textbf{(D) } 10^{164}}$.

See Also

2019 AMC 12A (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 14
Followed by
Problem 16
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AMC 12 Problems and Solutions

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