Difference between revisions of "Integral domain"

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[[Category:Ring theory]]

Revision as of 16:26, 5 September 2008

An integral domain is a commutative domain.

More explicitly a ring, $R$, is an integral domain if:

  • it is commutative,
  • $0\neq 1$ (where $0$ and $1$ are the additive and multiplicative identities, respectively)
  • and it contains no zero divisors (i.e. there are no nonzero $x,y\in R$ such that $xy = 0$).

Examples

Some common examples of integral domains are:

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