Difference between revisions of "Jadhav Division Axiom"

(Created page with "'''Jadhav Division Axiom''', gives a way to '''correctly predict''' the number of digits before decimal point in an incomplete or improper, division process left with remainde...")
 
(Statement)
 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 4: Line 4:
 
In an incomplete division process if the dividend is '''lesser then''' Divisor into product of 10 raise to a '''power "k"''', and '''bigger then''' divisor into product of 10 with '''power "k-1"''' then there will be k number of terms before decimal point in an divisional process.
 
In an incomplete division process if the dividend is '''lesser then''' Divisor into product of 10 raise to a '''power "k"''', and '''bigger then''' divisor into product of 10 with '''power "k-1"''' then there will be k number of terms before decimal point in an divisional process.
  
==== <math>d \times 10^k-1<n < d \times 10^k  </math>  ====
+
==== <math>d \times 10^{k-1}<n < d \times 10^k  </math>  ====
 
'''Number of digits before decimal point is k''' (here d represents divisor and n represents dividend)
 
'''Number of digits before decimal point is k''' (here d represents divisor and n represents dividend)
  
Line 24: Line 24:
 
== Other Discoveries by Jyotiraditya Jadhav ==
 
== Other Discoveries by Jyotiraditya Jadhav ==
  
* '''[[Jadhav theorem|Jadhav theorem]]'''
+
* '''[[Jadhav Theorem|Jadhav Theorem]]'''
 
* '''[[Jadhav Triads]]'''  
 
* '''[[Jadhav Triads]]'''  
 
* '''[[Zeta]]'''
 
* '''[[Zeta]]'''
 
* '''[[Jadhav Isosceles Formula]]'''
 
* '''[[Jadhav Isosceles Formula]]'''

Latest revision as of 08:04, 12 July 2021

Jadhav Division Axiom, gives a way to correctly predict the number of digits before decimal point in an incomplete or improper, division process left with remainder zero and a Quotient with decimal part, given by Jyotiraditya Jadhav

Statement

In an incomplete division process if the dividend is lesser then Divisor into product of 10 raise to a power "k", and bigger then divisor into product of 10 with power "k-1" then there will be k number of terms before decimal point in an divisional process.

$d \times 10^{k-1}<n < d \times 10^k$

Number of digits before decimal point is k (here d represents divisor and n represents dividend)

Practical Observations

22/7 = 3.14

here { 7 X 10 ^(1-1) < 22 < 7 X 10^1 } , so number of digits before decimal point is 1

100/ 6 = 16.6

here {6 X 10^(2-1)<100<6 X 10^2 }, so number of digits before decimal point is 2

Uses

  • All type of division processes
  • Can be used to correctly predict the nature of the answer for long division processes.
  • Can be used to determine the sin and cosine functions of extreme angles

Other Discoveries by Jyotiraditya Jadhav

Invalid username
Login to AoPS