Difference between revisions of "Origin"

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The '''origin''' of a [[coordinate]] system is the [[center]] point or [[zero]] point where the axes meet.
 
The '''origin''' of a [[coordinate]] system is the [[center]] point or [[zero]] point where the axes meet.
  
In the Euclidean plane <math>\mathbb{R}^2</math>, the origin is <math>(0,0)</math>. Similarly, in the [[Euclidean space]] <math>\mathbb{R}^3</math>, the origin is <math>(0,0,0)</math>. This way, in general, the origin of an <math>n</math>-dimensional Euclidean space <math>\mathbb{R}^n</math> is the <math>n</math>-tuple <math>(0,0,\dots,0)</math> with all its <math>n</math> components equal to zero.
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==Euclidean==
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In the Euclidean [[plane]] <math>\mathbb{R}^2</math>, the origin is <math>(0,0)</math>. Similarly, in the Euclidean [[space]] <math>\mathbb{R}^3</math>, the origin is <math>(0,0,0)</math>. This way, in general, the origin of an <math>n</math>-dimensional Euclidean space <math>\mathbb{R}^n</math> is the <math>n</math>-tuple <math>(0,0,\ldots,0)</math> with all its <math>n</math> components equal to zero.
  
 
Thus, the origin of any coordinate system is the point where all of its components are equal to zero.
 
Thus, the origin of any coordinate system is the point where all of its components are equal to zero.

Revision as of 18:11, 15 November 2007

This article is a stub. Help us out by expanding it.

The origin of a coordinate system is the center point or zero point where the axes meet.

Euclidean

In the Euclidean plane $\mathbb{R}^2$, the origin is $(0,0)$. Similarly, in the Euclidean space $\mathbb{R}^3$, the origin is $(0,0,0)$. This way, in general, the origin of an $n$-dimensional Euclidean space $\mathbb{R}^n$ is the $n$-tuple $(0,0,\ldots,0)$ with all its $n$ components equal to zero.

Thus, the origin of any coordinate system is the point where all of its components are equal to zero.

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