Difference between revisions of "2004 AMC 10A Problems/Problem 20"

(Solution)
m (Solution 2 (Non-trig))
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==Solution 2 (Non-trig) ==
 
==Solution 2 (Non-trig) ==
Without loss of generality let the side length of <math>ABCD</math> be 1. Let <math>DE = x</math> and <math>AE = 1 - x</math>. Then triangles <math>ABE</math> and <math>CBF</math> are clearly congruent by HL, so <math>CF = AE</math> and <math>DE = DF</math>. We find that <math>BE = EF = x \sqrt{2}</math>, and so, by the Pythagorean Theorem, we have
+
Without loss of generality, let the side length of <math>ABCD</math> be 1. Let <math>DE = x</math> and <math>AE = 1 - x</math>. Then triangles <math>ABE</math> and <math>CBF</math> are clearly congruent by HL, so <math>CF = AE</math> and <math>DE = DF</math>. We find that <math>BE = EF = x \sqrt{2}</math>, and so, by the Pythagorean Theorem, we have
 
<math>(1 - x)^2 + 1 = 2x^2.</math> This yields <math>x^2 + 2x = 2</math>, so <math>x^2 = 2 - 2x</math>. Thus, the desired ratio of areas is
 
<math>(1 - x)^2 + 1 = 2x^2.</math> This yields <math>x^2 + 2x = 2</math>, so <math>x^2 = 2 - 2x</math>. Thus, the desired ratio of areas is
 
<cmath>\frac{\frac{x^2}{2}}{\frac{1-x}{2}} = \frac{x^2}{1 - x} = 2.</cmath>
 
<cmath>\frac{\frac{x^2}{2}}{\frac{1-x}{2}} = \frac{x^2}{1 - x} = 2.</cmath>

Revision as of 21:17, 20 May 2017

Problem

Points $E$ and $F$ are located on square $ABCD$ so that $\triangle BEF$ is equilateral. What is the ratio of the area of $\triangle DEF$ to that of $\triangle ABE$?

AMC10 2004A 20.png

$\mathrm{(A) \ } \frac{4}{3} \qquad \mathrm{(B) \ } \frac{3}{2} \qquad \mathrm{(C) \ } \sqrt{3} \qquad \mathrm{(D) \ } 2 \qquad \mathrm{(E) \ } 1+\sqrt{3}$

Solution

Since triangle $BEF$ is equilateral, $EA=FC$, and $EAB$ and $FCB$ are $SAS$ congruent. Thus, triangle $DEF$ is an isosceles right triangle. So we let $DE=x$. Thus $EF=EB=FB=x\sqrt{2}$. If we go angle chasing, we find out that $\angle AEB=75^{\circ}$, thus $\angle ABE=15^{\circ}$. $\frac{AE}{EB}=\sin{15^{\circ}}=\frac{\sqrt{6}-\sqrt{2}}{4}$. Thus $\frac{AE}{x\sqrt{2}}=\frac{\sqrt{6}-\sqrt{2}}{4}$, or $AE=\frac{x(\sqrt{3}-1)}{2}$. Thus $AB=\frac{x(\sqrt{3}+1)}{2}$, and $[ABE]=\frac{x^2}{4}$, and $[DEF]=\frac{x^2}{2}$. Thus the ratio of the areas is $\boxed{\mathrm{(D)}\ 2}$

Solution 2 (Non-trig)

Without loss of generality, let the side length of $ABCD$ be 1. Let $DE = x$ and $AE = 1 - x$. Then triangles $ABE$ and $CBF$ are clearly congruent by HL, so $CF = AE$ and $DE = DF$. We find that $BE = EF = x \sqrt{2}$, and so, by the Pythagorean Theorem, we have $(1 - x)^2 + 1 = 2x^2.$ This yields $x^2 + 2x = 2$, so $x^2 = 2 - 2x$. Thus, the desired ratio of areas is \[\frac{\frac{x^2}{2}}{\frac{1-x}{2}} = \frac{x^2}{1 - x} = 2.\]

See also

2004 AMC 10A (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 19
Followed by
Problem 21
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AMC 10 Problems and Solutions

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