Difference between revisions of "2005 AIME II Problems/Problem 4"

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== Problem ==
 
== Problem ==
Find the number of positive integers that are divisors of at least one of <math> 10^{10},15^7,18^{11}. </math>
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Find the number of [[positive integer]]s that are divisors of at least one of <math> 10^{10},15^7,18^{11}. </math>
  
 
== Solution ==
 
== Solution ==

Revision as of 00:11, 11 November 2006

Problem

Find the number of positive integers that are divisors of at least one of $10^{10},15^7,18^{11}.$

Solution

$10^{10} = 2^{10}\cdot 5^{10}$ so $10^{10}$ has $11\cdot11 = 121$ divisors.

$15^7 = 3^7\cdot5^7$ so $15^7$ has $8\cdot8 = 64$ divisors.

$18^{11} = 2^{11}\cdot3^{22}$ so $18^{11}$ has $12\cdot23 = 276$ divisors.

Now, we use the Principle of Inclusion-Exclusion. We have $121 + 64 + 276$ total potential divisors so far, but we've overcounted those factors which divide two or more of our three numbers. Thus, we must subtract off the divisors of their pair-wise greatest common divisors.

$\gcd(10^{10},15^7) = 5^7$ which has 8 divisors.

$\gcd(15^7, 18^{11}) = 3^7$ which has 8 divisors.

$\gcd(18^{11}, 10^{10}) = 2^{10}$ which has 11 divisors.

So now we have $121 + 64 + 276 - 8 -8 -11$ potential divisors. However, we've now undercounted those factors which divide all three of our numbers. Luckily, we see that the only such factor is 1, so we must add 1 to our previous sum to get an answer of $121 + 64 + 276 - 8 - 8 - 11 + 1 = 435$.

See Also

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