2013 AMC 10A Problems/Problem 23

Revision as of 23:30, 11 January 2018 by Pulusona (talk | contribs) (Solution 2 (Stewart's Theorem))
The following problem is from both the 2013 AMC 12A #19 and 2013 AMC 10A #23, so both problems redirect to this page.

Problem

In $\triangle ABC$, $AB = 86$, and $AC=97$. A circle with center $A$ and radius $AB$ intersects $\overline{BC}$ at points $B$ and $X$. Moreover $\overline{BX}$ and $\overline{CX}$ have integer lengths. What is $BC$?


$\textbf{(A)}\ 11\qquad\textbf{(B)}\ 28\qquad\textbf{(C)}\ 33\qquad\textbf{(D)}\ 61\qquad\textbf{(E)}\ 72$

Solution 1 (Power of a Point)

Let $BX = q$, $CX = p$, and $AC$ meets the circle at $Y$ and $Z$, with $Y$ on $AC$. Then $AZ = AY = 86$. Using the Power of a Point (Secant-Secant Power Theorem), we get that $p(p+q) = 11(183) = 11 * 3 * 61$. We know that $p+q>p$, so $p$ is either 3,11, or 33. We also know that $p>11$ by the triangle inequality on $\triangle ACX$. $p$ is 33. Thus, we get that $BC = p+q = \boxed{\textbf{(D) }61}$.

Solution 2 (Stewart's Theorem)

Stewart's Theorem: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stewart%27s_theorem.

Let $x$ represent $CX$, and let $y$ represent $BX$. Since the circle goes through $B$ and $X$, $AB = AX = 86$. Then by Stewart's Theorem,

$xy(x+y) + 86^2 (x+y) = 97^2 y + 86^2 x.$

$x^2 y + xy^2 + 86^2 x + 86^2 y = 97^2 y + 86^2 x$

$x^2 + xy + 86^2 = 97^2$

(Since $y$ cannot be equal to $0$, dividing both sides of the equation by $y$ is allowed.)

$x(x+y) = (97+86)(97-86)$

$x(x+y) = 2013$

The prime factors of $2013$ are $3$, $11$, and $61$. Obviously, $x < x+y$. In addition, by the Triangle Inequality, $BC < AB + AC$, so $x+y < 183$. Therefore, $x$ must equal $33$, and $x+y$ must equal $\boxed{\textbf{(D) }61}$.

Solution 3

Let $CX=x, BX=y$. Let the circle intersect $AC$ at $D$ and the diameter including $AD$ intersect the circle again at $E$. Use power of a point on point C to the circle centered at A.

So $CX*CB=CD*CE=>$ $x(x+y)=(97-86)(97+86)=>$ $x(x+y)=3*11*61$.

Obviously $x+y>x$ so we have three solution pairs for $(x,x+y)=(1,2013),(3,671),(11,183),(33,61)$. By the Triangle Inequality, only$x+y=61$ yields a possible length of $BX+CX=BC$.

Therefore, the answer is $\boxed{\textbf{(D) }61}$.

See Also

2013 AMC 10A (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 22
Followed by
Problem 24
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AMC 10 Problems and Solutions
2013 AMC 12A (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 18
Followed by
Problem 20
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AMC 12 Problems and Solutions

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