1990 AIME Problems/Problem 11

Revision as of 11:21, 3 March 2007 by Azjps (talk | contribs) (last part of solution is weak, but I think it works)

Problem

Someone observed that $6! = 8 \cdot 9 \cdot 10$. Find the largest positive integer $n^{}_{}$ for which $n^{}_{}!$ can be expressed as the product of $n - 3_{}^{}$ consecutive positive integers.

Solution

The product of $n - 3$ consecutive integers can be written as $\frac{(n - 3 + a)!}{a!}$ for some integer $a$. Thus, $n! = \frac{(n - 3 + a)!}{a!}$, from which it becomes evident that $a \ge 3$. Since $\displaystyle (n - 3 + a)! > n!$, we can rewrite this as $\frac{n!(n+1)(n+2) \ldots (n-3+a)}{a!} = n! \Longrightarrow (n+1)(n+2) \ldots (n-3+a) = a!$. For $a = 4$, we get $n + 1 = 4!$ so $n = 23$. For greater values of $a$, we need to find the product of $a-3$ consecutive integers that equals $a!$. $n$ can be approximated as $\displaystyle ^{a-3}\sqrt{a!}$, which decreases as $a$ increases. Thus, $n = 23$ is the greatest possible value to satisfy the given conditions.

See also

1990 AIME (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 10
Followed by
Problem 12
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
All AIME Problems and Solutions
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