Difference between revisions of "2011 AMC 12B Problems/Problem 20"

(Solution 1)
(Solution 1)
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The question now becomes calculate the sum of distance from each vertices to the circumcenter.  
 
The question now becomes calculate the sum of distance from each vertices to the circumcenter.  
  
We can calculate the distances with coordinate geometry. (Note that <math>XA = XB = XC</math> because <math>X</math> is the circumcenter.
+
We can calculate the distances with coordinate geometry. (Note that <math>XA = XB = XC</math> because <math>X</math> is the circumcenter.)
  
 
Let <math>A = (5,12)</math>, <math>B = (0,0)</math>, <math>C = (14, 0)</math>, <math>X= (x_0, y_0)</math>
 
Let <math>A = (5,12)</math>, <math>B = (0,0)</math>, <math>C = (14, 0)</math>, <math>X= (x_0, y_0)</math>

Revision as of 15:35, 5 February 2015

Problem

Triangle $ABC$ has $AB = 13, BC = 14$, and $AC = 15$. The points $D, E$, and $F$ are the midpoints of $\overline{AB}, \overline{BC}$, and $\overline{AC}$ respectively. Let $X \neq E$ be the intersection of the circumcircles of $\triangle BDE$ and $\triangle CEF$. What is $XA + XB + XC$?

$\textbf{(A)}\ 24 \qquad \textbf{(B)}\ 14\sqrt{3} \qquad \textbf{(C)}\ \frac{195}{8} \qquad \textbf{(D)}\ \frac{129\sqrt{7}}{14} \qquad \textbf{(E)}\ \frac{69\sqrt{2}}{4}$

Solution 1

Answer: (C)

Let us also consider the circumcircle of $\triangle ADF$.

Note that if we draw the perpendicular bisector of each side, we will have the circumcenter of $\triangle ABC$ which is $P$, Also, since $m\angle ADP = m\angle AFP = 90^\circ$. $ADPF$ is cyclic, similarly, $BDPE$ and $CEPF$ are also cyclic. With this, we know that the circumcircles of $\triangle ADF$, $\triangle BDE$ and $\triangle CEF$ all intercept at $P$, so $P$ is $X$.

The question now becomes calculate the sum of distance from each vertices to the circumcenter.

We can calculate the distances with coordinate geometry. (Note that $XA = XB = XC$ because $X$ is the circumcenter.)

Let $A = (5,12)$, $B = (0,0)$, $C = (14, 0)$, $X= (x_0, y_0)$

Then $X$ is on the line $x = 7$ and also the line with slope $-\frac{5}{12}$ and passes through $(2.5, 6)$.

$y_0 = 6-\frac{45}{24} = \frac{33}{8}$

So $X = (7, \frac{33}{8})$

and $XA +XB+XC = 3XB = 3\sqrt{7^2 + \left(\frac{33}{8}\right)^2} = 3\times\frac{65}{8}=\frac{195}{8}$

Solution 2

Consider an additional circumcircle on $\triangle ADF$. After drawing the diagram, it is noticed that each triangle has side values: $7$, $\frac{15}{2}$, $\frac{13}{2}$. Thus they are congruent, and their respective circumcircles are. By inspection, we see that $XA$, $XB$, and $XC$ are the circumdiameters, and so they are congruent. Therefore, the solution can be found by calculating one of these circumdiameters and multiplying it by a factor of $3$. We can find the circumradius quite easily with the formula $\sqrt{(s)(s-a)(s-b)(s-c)} = \frac{abc}{4R}$, s.t. $s=\frac{a+b+c}{2}$ and R is the circumradius. Since $s = \frac{21}{2}$:

\[\sqrt{(\frac{21}{2})(4)(3)(\frac{7}{2})} = \frac{\frac{15}{2}\cdot\frac{13}{2}\cdot 7}{4R}\]

After a few algebraic manipulations:

$\Rightarrow R = \frac{65}{16} \Rightarrow D=2R=\frac{65}{8} \Rightarrow 3D = \boxed{\frac{195}{8}}$.

See also

2011 AMC 12B (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 19
Followed by
Problem 21
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AMC 12 Problems and Solutions

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