Difference between revisions of "2020 AMC 8 Problems/Problem 3"

(Removed solutions that are effectively the same as each other, and improved clarity/wording)
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<math>\textbf{(A) }560 \qquad \textbf{(B) }960 \qquad \textbf{(C) }1120 \qquad \textbf{(D) }1920 \qquad \textbf{(E) }3840</math>
 
<math>\textbf{(A) }560 \qquad \textbf{(B) }960 \qquad \textbf{(C) }1120 \qquad \textbf{(D) }1920 \qquad \textbf{(E) }3840</math>
  
==Solution==
+
==Solution 1==
The answer is the product of the area of the field, the amount of strawberries per plant, and the amount of plants in one square feet. The answer is <math>6 \times 8 \times 10 \times 4 = 1920</math> or <math>\boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}</math>.
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The area of the garden is <math>6 \cdot 8 = 48</math> square feet. Since Carrie plants <math>4</math> strawberry plants per square foot, there are a total of <math>48 \cdot 4=192</math> strawberry plants, each of which produces <math>10</math> strawberries on average. Accordingly, she can expect to harvest <math>192 \cdot 10 = \boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}</math> strawberries.
  
 
==Solution 2==
 
==Solution 2==
The area of the garden is <math>6</math> ft <math>\times</math> <math>8</math> ft <math>= 48</math> square feet. Since Carrie plants <math>4</math> strawberry plants per square foot, it follows that she plants a total of <math>48 \times 4=192</math> strawberry plants. Since each strawberry plant produces on average 10 strawberries, it follows that she can expect to harvest <math>192 \times 10=1920</math> strawberries <math>\implies\boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}</math>.<br>
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Looking at the units of each quantity, we observe that the answer will be the product of the number of square feet, the number of plants per square foot, and the number of strawberries per plant. This gives <math>6 \cdot 8 \cdot 4 \cdot 10 = \boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}</math>.
~[http://artofproblemsolving.com/community/user/jmansuri junaidmansuri]
 
 
 
==Solution 3==
 
 
 
Note that <math>6\cdot 8 = 48</math>, so Carrie has <math>4\cdot 48 = 192</math> strawberry plants. Each plant produces <math>10</math> strawberries, so the final answer is <math>192\cdot 10 = \textbf{(D)}\ 1920</math>.'
 
==Solution 4==
 
The answer is <math>6 \times 8 \times 10 \times 4 = 1920</math> or <math>\boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}</math>.
 
-oceanxia
 
 
 
-franzliszt
 
  
 
==Video Solution==
 
==Video Solution==
 
https://youtu.be/7S0wAZMy2ZQ
 
https://youtu.be/7S0wAZMy2ZQ
 
~savannahsolver
 
  
 
==See also==  
 
==See also==  
 
{{AMC8 box|year=2020|num-b=2|num-a=4}}
 
{{AMC8 box|year=2020|num-b=2|num-a=4}}
 
{{MAA Notice}}
 
{{MAA Notice}}

Revision as of 06:57, 20 November 2020

Problem 3

Carrie has a rectangular garden that measures $6$ feet by $8$ feet. She plants the entire garden with strawberry plants. Carrie is able to plant $4$ strawberry plants per square foot, and she harvests an average of $10$ strawberries per plant. How many strawberries can she expect to harvest?

$\textbf{(A) }560 \qquad \textbf{(B) }960 \qquad \textbf{(C) }1120 \qquad \textbf{(D) }1920 \qquad \textbf{(E) }3840$

Solution 1

The area of the garden is $6 \cdot 8 = 48$ square feet. Since Carrie plants $4$ strawberry plants per square foot, there are a total of $48 \cdot 4=192$ strawberry plants, each of which produces $10$ strawberries on average. Accordingly, she can expect to harvest $192 \cdot 10 = \boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}$ strawberries.

Solution 2

Looking at the units of each quantity, we observe that the answer will be the product of the number of square feet, the number of plants per square foot, and the number of strawberries per plant. This gives $6 \cdot 8 \cdot 4 \cdot 10 = \boxed{\textbf{(D) }1920}$.

Video Solution

https://youtu.be/7S0wAZMy2ZQ

See also

2020 AMC 8 (ProblemsAnswer KeyResources)
Preceded by
Problem 2
Followed by
Problem 4
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
All AJHSME/AMC 8 Problems and Solutions

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